The Importance of Ancestry (Norway)

Norwegians were asked “How important for citizenship — in your opinion — is having ancestors from this country?”


Observations:

See the Comments on Germany‘s results, as they apply to Norway too.

The principal difference with Germany, as I see it, is that the Norwegian Young/Upper cohort is dramatically more “voelkisch” than the Middle-Aged/Upper. I cannot explain this. It does not fit the pattern seen in other European countries.

Among 100 Norwegian youth Answering “Yes”,
33 are Upper-class (32% overall)
37 are Middle-class (43% overall)
30 are Lower-class (25% overall)

#1 — Youth-“Yes”-es skew lower-class once again (as in Germany and Poland).
#2 — Young/Lower, as in Germany, has the highest “Yes” rate of any combination.
#3 –In Norway, “Yes” skews noticeably lower-class in all age cohorts, which was not true in Poland or Germany.
#4 — Note that both Norway and Thailand (the other country analyzed today) continue to uphold the pattern found among Oriental vs. European youth: “Voelkisch” attitudes tend to skew upper-class among Oriental youth, while they skew lower-class among European youth. [See South-Korea and China].

QUESTION
Why have Norwegian “upper-class” youth (the top-third in social-class, born after 1977) gotten more “voelkisch” than their immediate elders?

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4 Responses to The Importance of Ancestry (Norway)

  1. Pingback: Is Ancestry Important for Citizenship? (World) | Hail To You

  2. Pingback: Ancestry for Citizenship? (USA) | Hail To You

  3. Hail says:

    Note that the Progress Party, a party demanding a severe curtailment of Nonwhite immigration, as of late 2009 controls about one-fourth of the seats in the Norwegian legislature.

    Could this be because of the increasing share of the votes now being cast by Norwegians born in the 1970s and 1980s, who — as seen in the entry — are more ‘Voelkisch’ than their elders?

    Share of National-Assembly Seats won by the ‘far-right’ Progress Party
    2009: 24.3%
    2005: 22.4%
    2001: 15.8%
    1997: 14.8%
    1993: 6.1%
    1989: 13.3% [the death of Communism boosted patriotic parties across Europe in '89]
    1985: 1.3%

    • Hail says:

      I’d like to learn to what extent the above hypothesis is true. After some searching, I cannot find any ‘vote by age’ data for the 2009 Norwegian election. (I do not read Norwegian, which hampers that effort). If anyone else knows where to find this data, please post it here.

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