The Ethnopolitics of Christmas in the USA

Dr. Greg Johnson, formerly of San Francisco, has emerged over the past five years as a leading voice within the Racialist Right in North America (co-founding the “North American New Right” along the way, along with its flagship webzine Counter Currents). Johnson is a wonder; consistently principled, uncompromising, and committed to a high quality of discourse with neither any “dumbing down” nor any “Pee-Cee-ing up”.


Now, we know that conservative circles chatter about a “War on Christmas” every December. It also so happens that this year saw a member of Congress proclaim that a “War on Whites” exists in the USA. (Finally! Someone said it, exhaled millions.) Greg Johnson has a Christmas-themed essay up reflecting on the ethnopolitics of Christmas (which I think would be a fitting title for the essay) and thus, appropriately, weaves the two aforementioned “wars” together.


Excerpts from an essay on the Ethnopolitics of Christmas by Greg Johnson:

It was about twenty years ago when I first noticed that the greeting “Merry Christmas” was being replaced by the bland, neutral “Season’s Greetings” and “Happy Holidays.”

I asked a school teacher of my acquaintance, a benighted liberal who is an infallible barometer of the latest currents of political correctness, why this was happening. I was answered with another question: “If you were Jewish, wouldn’t you feel offended if someone wished you a Merry Christmas?” The tone communicated that this was self-evident, that we must avoid giving such offense at all costs, and that I was stupid for even asking. Obviously she had spent too much time talking down to students.

I thought to myself, “I would not be offended if a Jew wished me a Happy Hanukkah. That would be small-minded. So why should a Jew be offended if I wished him a Merry Christmas? What makes Jews different? Why do people cater to such small-mindedness?”

I also thought to myself, “Wouldn’t a pluralistic, liberal attitude imply many different holiday greetings, rather than one bland, characterless, homogeneous one?”

I also began to notice the proliferation of the abbreviation “X-mas,” even in greetings cards, store displays, and advertisements. Abbreviations are perfectly OK in hand-scrawled notes and emails. But they are gauche in more formal contexts, so I wondered what was driving this lapse in taste and style. Why are people literally “X”ing “Christ” out of “Christmas”? Is it merely another symptom of the secularization and commercialization of Christmas? But who is behind that trend? And is there some anti-Christian malice at work here?

Recently, there has been a proliferation of news stories about the destruction of Christmas in England and the US to cater to the tastes of anti-Christian minorities. For instance, in 2002 in Mobile, Alabama, the annual Christmas parade, celebrated since 1945, was to be renamed “The Jolly Holiday” parade. According to the organizers, “They said they wanted a name that was more inclusive, since the parade this year would include Hanukkah and Kwanzaa floats along with the usual Christmas fair [sic].”
[…]
But Kwanzaa is not destroying Christmas. Most Americans still have never heard of it, and no White American can think of it without embarrassment. Even White liberals probably prefer not to think of it at all, so it is not likely to be in the back of their minds when they wish you a hearty “Happy Holidays!” Besides, most Blacks who celebrate Kwanzaa probably celebrate Christmas too, so it is unlikely that they would bristle to the defense of Kwanzaa if wished a “Merry Christmas!”

No, it is the Jews who stole Christmas. Kwanzaa merely apes Hanukkah. Hanukkah is a minor Jewish holiday that celebrates, like most Jewish holidays, the massacre of tribal enemies. It is primarily in the US that Hanukkah has been promoted as a Jewish rival to Christmas.

The motives for this are unclear. One may be crypsis, the desire of some Jews to blend in among their host populations. Crypsis is certainly a motive in Reform Judaism. Reform synagogues have even adopted stained-glass windows and organ music to give the impression that Judaism is just another “Judeo-Christian” denomination.

Another motive may be rivalry: Jews recognize the appeal of Christmas, and want to keep their children busy doing something else during the Christmas season.

Malice probably also plays a role.

First, there is the resentment of the eternal outsider trying to make himself feel comfortable by breaking down the distinction between inside and outside. To do this, he has to efface the host culture’s defining symbols. A Jew feels outside when you say “Merry Christmas,” but he feels comfortable when you say “Happy Holidays.” Indeed, he feels pleased with this concrete token of his cultural and political power.

Then there is the particular resentment that Jews nurse toward Christianity. […] Jesus rejected Judaism for its tribalism, inhumanity, and intellectual dishonesty, and the truth hurts, so Jews hate Jesus as a bearer of bad news. […]

Read the full essay here. Dr. Johnson goes on to talk about how to “take back Christmas”, a proxy battle in the wider War on Whites.

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One Response to The Ethnopolitics of Christmas in the USA

  1. David Benson says:

    The X in Xmas is really the Greek letter Chi. It stands for Christos. This abbreviation predates the founding of America.

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